Big online retailers are still reaching far more users with their mobile websites than their mobile apps, Nielsen’s latest report shows.

The report was conducted on 5,000 U.S. smartphone users who participated in the research.

It shows that the combined reach for five big online retailers – Amazon, eBay, Target, Best Buy and Walmart – was around 50% of users for their mobile website, and around 25% of users for their mobile app in the period from October 2011 till January 2012. The combined reach averaged 52% to 59%.

Out of these five retailers, Amazon is by far the biggest, with its mobile website having a reach of over 15% in this period. It is followed by eBay with a 5% reach, and Walmart, Best Buy and Target, all of which have a reach lower than 5%. Interestingly enough, though, all of these retailers experienced a healthy reach “bump” on Black Friday, except eBay, whose bump was significantly less noticeable.

Finally, Nielsen’s report unveils a gender discrepancy between the mobile website visitors of these five retailers. Best Buy is predominantly visited by males (61%), while females (65% of them, to be exact) prefer Target. Walmart’s mobile website is also preferred by females, while eBay and Amazon are equally preferred by male and female visitors.

Image credit: Nielsen

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Whether they’re teaching classes about authentic Moroccan tagine cooking or how to live rent-free in New York City, peer-to-peer learning startup Skillshare lets its users market their classes online.

Now it also wants to be a place where brands, small businesses, non-profits and other organizations can market classes taught by their employees.

The startup launched branded hubs for organizations called “schools” this week. Its first partner for the new feature is GE, which launched a traveling workshop for teaching people how to use power tools (and other classes) at South by Southwest.

Brands list the classes their employees are teaching on Schools pages. They can also choose to feature classes from other Skillshare users. GE didn’t pay for its branded hub, but eventually Skillshare plans to turn the feature into a new revenue stream.

Small businesses have from the beginning used their Skillshare profile pages and classes to promote themselves. However, accounts designed for individuals don’t serve the needs of large organizations.

Establishing “schools” in addition to “classes” increases both Skillshare’s potential offerings and profits.

Image courtesy of iStockphoto, mattjeacock, skillshare, sxsw

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Survey: Telecommuting Becoming More Prevalent [INFOGRAPHIC]

Working from home is on the rise, and more companies are trusting their employees to be more productive in their own home offices than they might be at the workplace.

Digging deeper, Wrike, a company that makes collaboration software (so it has a stake in this game), conducted a survey with 1,074 rehttp://www.thesociety.org.au/home/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/1331533190.jpgondents, asking them a variety of questions about working from home.

The results showed that telecommuting is far more prevalent than we thought. In fact, 83% of the rehttp://www.thesociety.org.au/home/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/1331533190.jpgondents said they work remotely at least part of the day.

Some of us here at Mashable have considerable experience with working at home — many of us work at home at least 20% of the time, and some of our far-flung global staff telecommute 100% of the time. For instance, I’ve been working from my home office for various online sites for the past 12 years, with no ill effects thus far.

Working from home is not for everyone, but for many of us, it turns out to be more productive — ehttp://www.thesociety.org.au/home/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/1331533190.jpgecially when doing highly concentrated activities such as writing, editing and researching — than it is in a room full of beloved colleagues. But it’s not all sweetness and light. See the infographic below for accurate examples of the drawbacks.

Beyond those details, find out even more fun facts about the telecommuting revolution in this cute chart, and then let us know in the comments what you think about working from home. Do you believe telecommuting will become more prevalent in the coming years?

Infographic courtesy telecommuting/Tony Keller

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Virtual business card company CardFlick is giving its products a new look with the introduction of InstaCards, a web-based feature that now allows you to create virtual business cards using your Facebook and Instagram photos.

Cards created using the service can be shared — or “flicked” — to others who are using the app, as well as emailed to new or existing contacts. CardFlick has been downloaded more than 80,000 times, and according to founder Ketan Anjaria, the average InstaCard user shares those cards eight times a week versus the roughly two shares a traditional card built on the app sees.

“Design separates the best,” Anjaria told Mashable, “When you meet people, your first impression is everything.”

CardFlick is part of a growing number of virtual business card apps. In November, LinkedIn announced CardMunch, an app that allows you to take a picture of a traditional paper business card you receive and then save the content of the card as a contact in your phone. The app also integrates information from a person’s LinkedIn profile into the experience, so you can instantly see education and work experiences you might have in common with the person.

SEE ALSO: Is It Time To Finally Ditch Your Paper Business Cards?

If you’re excited about the prohttp://www.thesociety.org.au/home/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/1331419761.jpgect of putting your Facebook pictures on cards but aren’t ready to go virtual, the company Moo also started offering paper business cards this year designed to mimick your Facebook Timeline. There are also quite a few other unique traditional business card companies out there that can help you create memorable paper business cards.

Do you think virtual business cards on on their way to replacing their paper counterparts? Tell us your thoughts in the comments.

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